Category Archives: Online Revolution

Is the Leveson Inquiry Pointless in Today’s Online Media…

The Leveson report devotes very little space to the impact of the internet on journalism. Photograph: Sinister pictures/Demotix/Corbis

The Leveson report devotes very little space to the impact of the internet on journalism. Photograph: Sinister pictures/Demotix/Corbis

…most probably, yes. His mistake of not tackling the internet is a great one. Many journalists have expressed their opinions on the issue, and when reading three articles in particular and also discussing the topic in a lecture I have to agree with them. Leveson just does not get journalism today.

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Do ‘hyper-local’ news websites work?

I have read a selection of articles and papers on the success of ‘hyper-local’ news websites. A few of these show how they work and how they do not work. I personally feel that they provide a gap in the market, but some require more change and entrepreneurial thinking , to make sure they run successfully.  Read the rest of this entry

My Online Revolution Project: Twitter

Over the past few weeks of evaluating readings, publications and blogs, I have finally come to a conclusion on what I want to base my 6000 word research project on. In my Online Revolution seminar session I was required to do a presentation on my overall proposal, so I thought I would share this with you and see what you think. 

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The Future for Local and Regional Media.

This week I am taking a look into our local and regional media and whether it is under threat or not?

After reading this Publication from Parliament , which gives in-depth statics and research, I have come to the conclusion that  local/regional media is troubled not under threat. However it is important to note that this publication was created between the years 2009-2010, so things may have changed.  Read the rest of this entry

The Rise of Social Media and its Impact on Mainstream Journalism. Nic Newman.

Twitter Revolution by cartoonist Mike Luckovich.

When reading Nic Newman’s working paper: ‘The rise of social media and its impact on mainstream journalism’, a few topics arose which I found rather interesting. Firstly the success and falls of social media (mainly focusing on Twitter) and the relationship created from social media that you do not see in mainstream journalism. Read the rest of this entry

Who do we trust?

The problem’s we face as journalists today is the expectance to be great and efficient in both print and online media. Journalism is now easily compared to other data and media through the internet, which gives the public more of a chance to knock today’s journalism abilities. The rise of citizen journalism has also put a spin in the works.

“Today’s journalists are not sloppier than yesterday’s. Rather, readers are more demanding. Technology has given them more choice in other areas of their lives and they seek it in their media.” John Kelly, pg.9, Red Kayaks and Hidden Gold. Read the rest of this entry

The Revolution that Never Happened. Steen Steensen.

Has the online revolution changed the outlook of journalism? Are online resources being utilised to their full potential? Steen Steensen thinks not and I can agree with him to some extent. Take a look at his blog: Online Journalism and the promises of new technology. Steen Steensen’s blog.

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How the Web Changes the Economics of News – In All Media. Paul Bradshaw.

This week I am looking into Paul Bradshaw’s ‘How the Web Changes the Economics of News – In All Media’ from his Online Journalism Blog.

The blog post was not expressing any personal views as such but provided points and factors about how the web changed the economics of news. It is as if Paul Bradshaw was asking people in the industry to look and read the individual points he covered for them to then possibly act on them. If they did so, maybe a positive and balanced solution could be made for the economics of the media.

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