Blog Archives

Twitter Can Be Dangerous

Newsnight image: BBC News Website

In recent events it is evident that Twitter can be a very dangerous tool. The most recent Twitter story is about the Tory chairman Lord McAlpine and how he has been ambushed with false speculation through the internet, that he was the paedophile mentioned in the allegations on the BBC’s Newsnight. Within the past two weeks alone, Twitter has made an impact on many events such as the resignation of the Bureau for Investigative Journalism, Ian Overton, followed then by George Entwhistle, director general of the BBC. Read the rest of this entry

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What’s the use in Twitter?

“Twitter is one of a range of new social media technologies that allow for the online and instant dissemination of short fragments of data from a variety of official and unofficial sources.” (Hermida, 2010). Read the rest of this entry

The Future for Local and Regional Media.

This week I am taking a look into our local and regional media and whether it is under threat or not?

After reading this Publication from Parliament , which gives in-depth statics and research, I have come to the conclusion that  local/regional media is troubled not under threat. However it is important to note that this publication was created between the years 2009-2010, so things may have changed.  Read the rest of this entry

The Revolution that Never Happened. Steen Steensen.

Has the online revolution changed the outlook of journalism? Are online resources being utilised to their full potential? Steen Steensen thinks not and I can agree with him to some extent. Take a look at his blog: Online Journalism and the promises of new technology. Steen Steensen’s blog.

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How the Web Changes the Economics of News – In All Media. Paul Bradshaw.

This week I am looking into Paul Bradshaw’s ‘How the Web Changes the Economics of News – In All Media’ from his Online Journalism Blog.

The blog post was not expressing any personal views as such but provided points and factors about how the web changed the economics of news. It is as if Paul Bradshaw was asking people in the industry to look and read the individual points he covered for them to then possibly act on them. If they did so, maybe a positive and balanced solution could be made for the economics of the media.

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